Callie Girl

Her name is Callie.

callieShe’s cuter than any button that you ever could buy. She’s quite possibly in an orphanage, signed by her biological mother to be available for international adoption because of a deep rooted superstition that Down Syndrome is a sign of the parents confirmation of a place reserved in perpetual darkness in the afterlife. Can you imagine? Yes. You can. You’ve experienced devastating fear, gripping pain and complete aloneness over something. It doesn’t have to be over a child. It could be over a part lost in a play because you got food poisoning and can’t be there for the audition that you believe might turn your life around, thus giving that chance to someone who you believe absolutely doesn’t deserve it. Maybe the favorite color of lipstick you’ve always worn has been discontinued or a finals test that makes or breaks your desired career doesn’t work out, missing by just one question that you think of the moment after you have no second chance. That’s devastation. That’s the moment that you’ll cry inside, at least a part of, for what in that moment seems like a forever.

Callie’s birth mom? She may have dreamed of a, “perfect child” endured a hard delivery, bordered on the brink of death, carried through only by the love of a child that she’d bonded with over nine months of inside butterflies that turned to little kicks and caused her uterus to swell and that magic moment of delivery. After painful moments that turned into hours she held what initially appeared to be a perfect baby, perhaps she was told by her grandmother standing nearby that this baby looked like a family.

Very little information is given about “Callie” but easily we can imagine that isn’t wasn’t long after bringing this little girl home, her mother began to notice that her baby was unique in some incredibly undesirable ways. Perhaps it was that she was floppy, or maybe it was her flatter facial features as she progressed through that six week period in which babies begin to really look as they will as children and adults. Callie’s mother would doubtlessly been taught that Down Syndrome would shame her family. Her daughter either could be hidden forever, or institutionalized before word even got out that a child had been born. Judging by Callie’s young age, it looks like the second option was taken.

If you’ve read articles of advocating for fundraising of adoption from other countries you’ll hear about heartless abandonment. As a mother of four young children I refuse to write with that tone unless I explicitly read in a government document file translated into English by a social worker in that country that the child was found in a plastic bag near a drainage pipe or obvious form of disregard for life. Look at our society. Woman of all ages and across all levels of society and education are scared out of going full term in their pregnancy finding birth defect in their child in utero. While their child probably is not based on a fear of their place in the afterlife, it’s a life changing choice. Some of these woman come forward to write their story of guilt–of how they wish a million times over that they could take that moment back.

This is a post of hope.

Coming, baby girl.

Callie's familyThere is a family in Washington state that sees perfection. They’ve prayed and looked to the Lord for guidance. They believe that they’ve heard a resounding, “Yes” from the Lord and savior who says of Callie, “You are fearfully and wonderfully made.” Wonderfully made. This beautiful girl is gorgeous in the eye of GOD.

She’s made in perfection, she’s strong, she’s a testimony of his magnificent will and her life is a gift.

When Callie’s mom signed a form saying that this precious girl could travel overseas she granted the Henry family a chance to know and raise this precious child of God to His glory for as long as she shall live. I plan to continue to write about her story as it develops, bringing you the opportunity to help bring her home.

I will praise thee; for I am fearfully and wonderfully made: marvellous are thy works; and that my soul knoweth right well. Psa 139:14

This family is Jacqueline and Michael Henry along with their children Rhianon (16 and born in Ukraine), Tyler age 10 and sweet little Pyper is 3 who is soon to be a big sister.

Adoption from Callie’s country where soon-to-be big sister Rhianon was also born and grew up for a number of years, can easily be under a year from beginning to completion of process to the USA. Which means, if all goes smoothly, this baby could be celebrating her birthday a little late as a Henry in Washington state. Can you imagine? Yes, you can, because at some point in your life you had an opportunity that blew you away. A chance that changed your life, that came so unexpectedly that could have been yesterday or many years back that just turned everything around. Maybe, maybe even adoption.

Here is a little more about the Henry family.

Mama and Daddy:

They were first loves. Jaqueline attests to loving Michael from age 14. The two love birds have been married since 1983, considering themselves together for 37 years. How magnificent!

Michael is manager at a Napa store, while Jaqueline stays at home with their children as a full time mother, feeling that there is room in her heart and home for little Callie who they will give a new name upon her arrival.

Fundraisers tentatively planned.
An auction to launch in October. It will have teas from my online store that I already have in stalk at home and will personally ship. The auction will also have Pampered Chef products from Jaqueline’s direct sales line. We’ll have coats and baby hats available as well. Everything will have a base bid that includes shipping costs and run for two weeks.

We also want to have a shoe fundraiser and have details forth coming.

For Callie, being a child with special needs we’d like to honor her in a Super Hero Cape Fundraiser. Please click those words to learn about how that works. A date has yet to be picked, we’re open to the idea of having it open through the whole of this process as it’s a wonderful way to bring awareness.

Current financial needs. There is no mercy with adoption waiting periods. When it’s time to pay, it’s time to pay. Good intentions don’t win the race. Here’s what the Henry family is up against right now: The complete charge for commitment, $500, which will closely be followed by the $1500 for the homestudy, which is a social worker coming in to check out the Henry’s home for safety and preparedness to give proper care for a baby, showing that they have space and facilities to have a child of Callie’s age. If you’re interested in contributing the beginning of this journey, please visit Gofundme through this link: Adopting Down Syndrome Pureness

As I’ve been writing this piece I’ve been in conversation with the wonderful woman who God has give then heart to be Callie’s mother. She welcomes questions from you as well, my reader. Please reach Jacqueline through her email: jlovesdownsyndrome@gmail.com
or the regularly checked address: jacki1224@aol.com

Again, congratulations to the Henry family and many blessings as they follow God’s bidding to travel overseas to gain a daughter.

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